Categories Watercolour


Watercolour

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Watercolour is one of my absolute favourite medium! It is clean, extremely easy to work with and lightweight to bring around with you.

Many parents might think that watercolour (like oil pastels/crayons) are for little kids, and are not very keen to let their child explore the medium. What they do not understand is the flexibility and possibility that this medium has.

Today, we’ll look at fifteen ways you can make your watercolour painting experience more exciting!

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Supplies
-watercolours*
-watercolour paper
-ruler
-permanent marker
-brushes
-washi tape/masking fluid/rubber cement
-stamp (or something with a cool texture)
-salt
-rubbing alcohol
-water
-straw
-stick with a sharp point
-tissue

*I honestly can’t remember the brand of the blue palette, but I got it from Popular Bookstore. The white one is Daler Rowney Watercolour Pocket Set, the discs are from Koh-I-Noor.

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Start by drawing fifteen boxes onto your paper and label them.
1. Flat/Solid Wash
2. Graded Wash
3. Glazing
4. Masking/Resist
5. Scratching
6. Wet on Wet
7. Salt
8. Stamping
9. Opaque vs Transparent
10. Hard vs Soft Edges
11. Wipe Out
12. Dry Brush
13. Alcohol
14. Water Splatter
15. Blowing

Before starting, paint a thin wash of colour in your Glazing box. Apply washi tape or masking fluid in your Masking/Resist box.

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1.Flat/Solid Wash
A flat wash is a smooth, even layer of watercolour on your paper. This is best done with a large flat brush.

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2. Graded Wash
A graded wash is when paint gradually lightens in saturation with each stroke.

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3. Glazing
Glazing, simply put is layering. Paints can be applied layer after layer to achieve the desired effect/shade. Just ensure that each layer is throughly dry before painting on the next!

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4. Masking/Resist
This is pretty self explanatory – you block off certain areas on your paper that you don’t want to paint. I’ve been using this to make cards recently – blocking out hand written text. Ensure the paint is dry before peeling off the masking.

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5. Scratching
Scratching or Sgrafitto is done by scratching on a wet painted surface with a sharp point. This causes the wet paint to seep into the scratches, creating dark lines.

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6. Wet on Wet
Wet on wet, like the title suggest, is painting on a wet surface.

Start by spraying/painting a light amount of water onto your paper, then paint over it. If your surface is wet enough, the paints will spread towards each other and blend.

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7. Salt
Start with a wet wash and sprinkle salt before it dries up too much. The salt will absorb the watercolour pigments leaving behind little spots. I love using this method for stars! Experiment with fine and coarse salt grains!

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8. Stamping
I should have used a clean stamp for this example. But the idea is to create texture by using objects to make imprints onto a damp wash.

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9. Opaque vs Transparent
A transparent paint usually have finer pigments in it, allows light to pass through and is great for glazing. An opaque paint will have a chalky appearance when dry. Test your paint by painting over a thick black line and see how much of it shows through.

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10. Hard vs Soft Edges
Hard edges are usually good for clean, distinct lines. However, if you’re looking for a more gentle look, try using a clean damp brush to blend out the edge.

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11. Wipe Out
This is done by using tissue or a dry brush to lift up semi dry paints from the paper. Love doing this for clouds, saves me lots of time!

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12. Dry Brush
Wet your brush slightly and dab off as much water on a paper towel as much as possible, then load it up with pigments! Brush this over completely dry paper, this will give you feathery edges.

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13. Alcohol
By dripping alcohol onto a damp wash (when the wash has lost its shine), it almost immediately lifts off the paint from the spot to create white circular shapes. To create a more subtle effect, use a spray bottle!

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14. Water Splatter
Simply splatted wet paint onto a wet wash that you’ve done. This allows the paint to blend into each other. The results are often unpredictable but are really interesting to watch!

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15. Blowing
Add a thick blop of paint into a spot on your paper and start blowing (with a straw) in the direction that you want. The kids love doing this for their tree branches!

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Tips! Paints that are not fully dried are usually cool to the touch.

Go have some fun! xx. Cherlyn