Categories Sketching


Sketching

Hello all! If you’ve been following us on Facebook, you would have seen some of the kiddos’ sketches. Over the years, whenever I introduced good old sketching to my students, I always get the same questions from parents: Can you let them focus more on painting and not just pencil drawing. My answer? Before you start to paint, you must first draw. Not to mention learning about proportion, balance, space, light and shadows, etc through sketching. 10393664_396946450470464_8634954278062030462_n These are some of the practices I’ve doing with the kiddos. I hope they are helpful to start your child (or yourself) on sketching!

Supplies
A few objects to draw
Flashlight
Graphite Pencils
Erasers

Usually to make the impact bigger, I will let my students choose a subject and get them to sketch and shade it without teaching them first. These are some examples:

Right: Self portrait after learning how to Left: Self portrait before learning how to

Left: Self portrait after learning how to Right: Self portrait before learning how to

Left: Self portrait after learning how to Right: Self portrait before learning how to

Left: Self portrait before learning how to Right: Self portrait after learning how to

ONE : Understanding SHADES & TONES

Introduce different grades of pencils to your child. Explain to them what the alphabets mean (H = Hardness, B = Blackness/Softness). Let them try out the differences. Guide them on applying different pressure to the same pencil to achieve different tones using the following exercise.

peng

Image: http://www.differencebetween.info/difference-between-hb-and-f-pencil

20150527_234525

TWO : Shading

Used in drawing for depicting levels of darkness on paper by applying media more densely or with a darker shade for darker areas, and less densely or with a lighter shade for lighter areas. Show them the different types of shading techniques, and get them to try it for themselves using the following exercise.

20150527_234537 20150527_234209 For smudging, the most basic tool is to use our fingers. However, you can also explore with a piece of tissue, blending stump or soft eraser.

THREE : Light Source

Prepare a few opaque objects, and a flashlight. Shine the flashlight at the objects from different directions, observe the shadows and highlights when the light moves around.

FOUR : Apply & Practice

By now, I’m sure you, or your child have found your favourite shading technique. Draw a Sphere, Cube, Cylinder and Cone. Decide on a light source (draw an arrow pointing towards your object to indicate), and shade. The sphere will be a little trickier, due to the reflected light. This youtube tutorial gives very clear and simple explanations on it.

CubeSphereConeCylinderNoBackgrnd

Image: http://www.frankrobertdixon.com/practice/4-shapes/

sphere

Image: http://daphne.palomar.edu/design/space.html

FIVE : Sketch and shade the chosen subject.

For the first sketch, we did it from an observation of an online image. Then we moved on to observing the actual subject.

Observation Sketching

Observation Sketching

Observation Sketching

Observation Sketching

Basic of Sketching and Shading

Basic of Sketching and Shading

SIX : Practice

Using what we learnt above, we drew and painted the chosen subject. Most of them said that after the sketching and shading exercises, they are able to do it a lot easier the second time.

Basic of Tones

Basic of Tones

Shades and Tones

Shades and Tones

Woah! Congratulations on making it this far! Always remember, Practice makes Perfect Permanent!

Share with us your creations via #artathomesg We would love to see your works!

Teacher Cherlyn